CAT Control with N1MM+ and a Yaesu FT-450D

When participating in amateur radio contests, my logging software of choice is N1MM+. This tidy little logger is highly optimized for contesting, automatically updating its user interface to prompt the user for the information required to log a valid contact.

One major quality of life improvement for me has been rigging up N1MM+ to talk to my HF rig via CAT control. This allows the logging software to automatically transmit pre-recorded macros on my behalf at the appropriate times during a contact, which saves me from having to yell my callsign over and over again when trying to break through a pileup.

Because every radio is different, configuring N1MM+ to control your rig can be a bit of a bear. Below are the steps that I followed to get things working:

Tell N1MM+ What Kind of Radio You Have

From the main window of N1MM+, select Configure Ports, Mode Control, Winkey, etc… from the Config menu.

In the Configurer window that appears, activate the Hardware tab. Select the COM port that your radio is attached to from the Port dropdown, and the make and model of your radio from the Radio dropdown.

Next, click on the Set button under the Details header. In the window that pops up, select the baud rate of the serial connection with your radio from the Speed dropdown.

Click the OK button twice to dismiss both windows and navigate back to the main window of N1MM+.

Customize the CAT Commands that N1MM+ Sends to your Radio

From the Config menu, select Change CW/SSB/Digital Function Key Definitions > Change SSB Function Key Definitions. In the SSB Message Editor window that appears, you can edit the contents of the config file that controls the CAT commands that N1MM+ sends to your radio at different stages of the contact.

When running (i.e. sitting on a particular frequency calling CQ and waiting for other operators to call me back), I execute the VM1TX function on my Yaesu FT-450D, which transmits a pre-recorded macro that says something like “CQ Contest CQ Contest, Victor Alpha Three Juliet Foxtrot Zulu”.

To execute this command, I have to configure N1MM+ to execute the {CAT1ASC PB7;} command. CAT1ASC tells N1MM+ to send an ASCII command down the serial connection, and PB7; tells my rig to execute the VM1TX function, which transmits the pre-recorded macro.

Similarly, when searching and pouncing (i.e. tooling around the band looking for other operators who are calling CQ), I execute the VM2TX function on my radio, which transmits a different pre-recorded macro says my callsign. I use this when answering another operator and waiting for them to acknowledge me.

Executing this command is much the same as the previous. I configure N1MM+ to execute the {CAT1ASC PB8;} command, which tells my rig to execute the VM2TX function, transmitting the pre-recorded macro.

For reference, here’s the contents of my entire SSB Message Editor config file:

#
# SSB Function Key File
#
# Edits may be necessary before using this file
# Use Ctrl+O in the program to set the Operator callsign
#
###################
#   RUN Messages
###################
F1 CQ,{CAT1ASC PB7;}
F2 Exch,{OPERATOR}\CqwwExchange.wav
F3 TNX,{OPERATOR}\Thanks.wav
F4 {MYCALL},{CAT1ASC PB7;}
# Add "!" to the F5 message if you are using voicing of callsigns 
F5 His Call,
F6 Spare,
F7 QRZ?,{OPERATOR}\QRZ.wav
F8 Agn?,{OPERATOR}\AllAgain.wav
F9 Zone?,{OPERATOR}\ZoneQuery.wav
F10 Spare,
F11 Spare,
F12 Wipe,{WIPE}
#
###################
#   S&P Messages
###################
# "&" doubled, displays one "&" in the button label
F1 S&&P CQ,{CAT1ASC PB8;}
F2 Exch,{OPERATOR}\S&PExchange.wav
F3 Spare,
F4 {MYCALL},{CAT1ASC PB8;}
# Add "!" to the F5 message if you are using voicing of callsigns 
F5 His Call,
F6 Spare,
F7 Rpt Exch,{OPERATOR}\RepeatExchange.wav
F8 Agn?,{OPERATOR\AllAgain.wav
F9 Zone,{OPERATOR}\RepeatZone.wav
F10 Spare,
F11 Spare,
F12 Wipe,{WIPE}

Note of course that unless you also run a Yaesu FT-450D, lines 10, 13, 28, and 31 will need to be customized to send CAT commands appropriate to your radio.

Reading through the file may also suggest to you that there is more than one way to skin this cat; indeed, it is possible to configure N1MM+ to key your radio and then play a WAV file from your computer, assuming that you pipe the audio from your computer into your rig. This can be a solution for radios that don’t allow you to record voice macros, or for operators who want to use a wider range of macros than their radio supports.

Good luck and happy contesting!

Leave a Comment

Filed under Amateur Radio, Software

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *